ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

lightofdwayna:

Guild Wars 2: Concept Art (x)

(x)

(via kekai-k)

edwardspoonhands:

Today I launched a new channel…another new channel, I know. On this channel I will be doing not much besides (hopefully being entertaining while playing video games. This first video is of me playing a terrifying horror game in which my heart beat goes from an uncomfortable 100 beats per minute to a FREAKING HORRIFIED 140 beats per minute in less than two seconds!

We’ll be uploading a new video EVERY SINGLE DAY FOREVER. Or at least, that’s the plan. Welcome to Games with Hank!

"Make Me A Robot" | Autumn Andersen & Tessa Violet

(Source: theautumnbottom, via tessaviolet)

freeglassart Asked:
You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

typette:

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

image

start to put on features

image

fix stuff

image

put on more stuff

image

fix stuff again

image

erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

image

2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

image

image

image

That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

it’s nice to see how others do stuff like this, everyone is different but there’s something to learn from everybody!

"Everything's so wonderful. Just wait till you meet him!" (x)

Pencil test animation for Sleeping Beauty (by Marc Davis)

(Source: mickeyandcompany, via travelerontheedge17)

d-o-r-ia-n:

little-crazy-misha-minion:

thereaintnorestforthefandoms:

queen-of-the-rising-demons:

The Four Founders of Hogwarts.

This fucked me up for a good 5 minutes.

oh

Oh God…

OHH

(Source: georgies-closet, via travelerontheedge17)

beckpoppins:

tally-art:

schweizercomics:

yamino:

thedragonflywarrior:

The Body Shapes of the World’s Best Athletes Compared Side By Side

Health and fitness comes in all shapes and sizes. Every single one of these athletes is a certified bad-ass.

I’ve posted this before but it’s worth reblogging!

Just a reminder - if you’re drawing a team superhero book and more than one of your characters has the same build YOU’RE DOING IT ALL WRONG

Always reblog

humans come in every shape, all the shapes are good.

(via travelerontheedge17)

brains-and-bodies:

From Natural Selection

"While these organised structures might look like the work of an artist, they’re actually just the remnants left behind where a sand bubbler crab’s been snacking. During low tide they exit their burrows (as seen in the top pic) to scour the sand for tiny bits of organic debris in a radial motion. While eating, the crabs ball the excess sand on their heads, then discard it when it gets too big for them to see over, leaving behind a remarkable-looking reminder which helps them keep from searching for food in the same sand twice.Each time High Tide returns, the small structures crumble and are washed away, all while leaving behind more food particles to fuel the tiny crab’s next accidentally artistic pursuits.”Source: http://tinyurl.com/7vpzwj8Video of the Sand bubbler crab in action:http://vimeo.com/6449515

brains-and-bodies:

From Natural Selection

"While these organised structures might look like the work of an artist, they’re actually just the remnants left behind where a sand bubbler crab’s been snacking. 

During low tide they exit their burrows (as seen in the top pic) to scour the sand for tiny bits of organic debris in a radial motion. While eating, the crabs ball the excess sand on their heads, then discard it when it gets too big for them to see over, leaving behind a remarkable-looking reminder which helps them keep from searching for food in the same sand twice.

Each time High Tide returns, the small structures crumble and are washed away, all while leaving behind more food particles to fuel the tiny crab’s next accidentally artistic pursuits.”

Source: http://tinyurl.com/7vpzwj8
Video of the Sand bubbler crab in action:http://vimeo.com/6449515

(via scishow)